Nazi Gold Train – Fact or Fiction?

14925413_363037487371673_7064672069941363090_nIt’s well known that during WWII, agents from the Third Reich acting on behalf of the ruling Nazi Party of Germany plundered many cities. Most notably by military units known as the Kunstschutz. In addition to gold, silver and currency, cultural items of great significance were stolen, including paintings, ceramics, books, and religious treasures. Most of these items were recovered by agents of the Monuments, Fine Arts, and Archives program (MFAA)(Monuments Men), on behalf of the Allies. Thousands of items remain missing. One of the most popular legends where the treasures ended up are The Nazi Gold Trains.

If the legends are true, it would be one of the greatest modern treasure finds of the century. But is there any truth to the legend of the Nazi Gold Train?

The train or trains are believed to be near the Polish city of Wałbrzych, which until 1945 was the German city of Waldenburg. According to local legend, the train or trains left Breslau (now Wrocław) laden with gold and other treasures. They were driven into a system of tunnels under the Owl Mountains that were part of an unfinished Nazi secret Project Riese near Wałbrzych. There they were buried in a series of tunnels and mines created by the Nazis. The trains are rumoured to hold up to 300 tons of gold, jewels, weapons and masterpieces.

The estimated value of the treasure would be priceless. If you had to put a value some historians believe the train could hold up to $30 billion in missing treasures, including gold bars, missing masterpieces, and silverware that was stolen from Jewish people.

Recently, two men came forward claiming to have a deathbed confession from someone who knew the location of the trains. After months of searching their claims came up empty. The legend lives on in the town of Wałbrzych. They have seen a 44% increase in tourism with people hoping to find the treasure. We many never know what happened to the missing treasures or if the trains ever existed.

Adela