Pegasus

Pegasus and Bellerophon memorial to the Parachute Regiment at National Memorial Aboretum,

Pegasus and Bellerophon memorial to the Parachute Regiment at National Memorial Aboretum,

Pegasus was the beautiful white winged stallion of Greek Myths.
The most well know tale of his birth is that he sprang to life from the blood of the Gorgon Medusa after she was killed by Perseus.
Zeus, king of the gods, instructed him to bring lightning and thunder from Olympus. Friend of the Muses, Pegasus is the creator of Hippocrene, the fountain on Mt. Helicon. He was captured by the Greek hero Bellerophon near the fountain Peirene with the help of Athena and Poseidon. Pegasus allows the hero to ride him to defeat the monster Chimera. Zeus eventually transforms him into the constellation Pegasus and places him up in the sky as a reward for his faithful service.

Pegasus as a symbol has been used since ancient times on pottery and paintings. Poets also drew inspiration from him. His symbol and name is still widely used today. Some Examples include:

World War II, the silhouetted image of Bellerophon the warrior, mounted on the winged Pegasus, was adopted by the United Kingdom’s newly raised parachute troops in 1941 as their upper sleeve.
It’s also featured on the flag and coat of arms of Robinson College, the most recently-built college of Cambridge University.
US Air Force KC-46A tanker is named for Pegasus.
The English Association Football Club Newcastle United has two winged horses on its crest.

Adela